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Department of Anthropology

The courses offered by the Department of Anthropology are organized into three different fields: social/cultural anthropology, archaeology, and physical anthropology; and three different levels: introductory, intermediate, and advanced.

Courses at the introductory level, numbered in the 1000 range, are intended for first-year or beginning students of anthropology. Students should note that these courses are prerequisites
for all others in their respective fields and levels: ANTH 1013 is a prerequisite for all other courses in social/cultural anthropology; ANTH 1023 is a prerequisite for all other courses in physical anthropology with the exception of ANTH 2443 and the courses in forensic anthropology; and ANTH 1033 is a prerequisite for all other courses in archaeology.

Courses at the intermediate level, numbered in the 2000 range, are intended for students who wish to pursue their study of anthropology, as well as students in other disciplines with an interest in anthropology. All other students intending to proceed to advancedlevel courses are required to take ANTH 2543.

Courses at the advanced level are intended for students majoring and honouring in anthropology, though other third and fourth-year students with a strong interest in anthropology are welcome. Courses at the 3000 level are for students in their third and fourth years. Courses at the 4000 level are intended for fourth-year students majoring or honouring in anthropology; permission of the instructor is required for admission to these courses.

Division of Courses Into Fields and Levels

Introductory Courses
ANTH 1013 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1023 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
ANTH 1033 Introduction to Archaeology

Intermediate and Advanced-Level Courses
Social/Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 2513 Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 2523 Social Anthropology
ANTH 2533 Women in Cross-cultural Perspective
ANTH 2543 Constructing Social/Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 2553 Language, Culture, and Society
ANTH 2563 Cultural Geography
ANTH 2623 Applied Anthropology
ANTH 2633 Issues in Ethnomusicoloy
ANTH 2806 Readings in Anthropological Theory
ANTH 3003-3153 Area Ethnography
     ANTH 3003 Caribbean
     ANTH 3013 South America
     ANTH 3023 Circumpolar North
     ANTH 3033 Urban Aboriginal Peoples
     ANTH 3043 Mexico and Central America
     ANTH 3053 The Mediterranean
     ANTH 3063 North America
     ANTH 3073 Canada
     ANTH 3083 Eastern North America
     ANTH 3103 Southeast Asia
     ANTH 3123 Africa
     ANTH 3153 Australia
ANTH 3303 Anthropology of Law and Justice
ANTH 3313 The Anthropology of Art and Communication
ANTH 3323 Hunter-Gatherers in the Modern World
ANTH 3333 Economic Anthropology: Anthropology of Exchange
ANTH 3533 Food
ANTH 3643 Anthropology of Religion
ANTH 3663 Urban Anthropology
ANTH 3673 World Music
ANTH 3723 Human Ecology
ANTH 3803 Reading Ethnography
ANTH 3913 Research Methods: Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods

Archaeology
ANTH 2303 Issues in Archaeology
ANTH 2313 Archaeology of Early Societies - The Americas
ANTH 2323 Archaeology of Early Societies - Eurasia, Africa, Oceania

Physical Anthropology
ANTH 2413 Human Physical Variation and Variability
ANTH 2423 Human Evolution: Fact and Theory
ANTH 2443 Human Skeletal Biology

Forensic Anthropology
ANTH 3443 Forensic Osteology and Archaeology
ANTH 4443 Applied Forensic Anthropology

Advanced and Honours Courses
ANTH 4003 Issues in Anthropology
ANTH 4013 Honours Seminar
ANTH 4453 Seminar on Selected Topics
ANTH 4553/6 Independent Study
ANTH 4666 Honours Thesis

Honours in Anthropology


To gain entry to the Honours Programme, students must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average for all university courses. To earn an Honours degree, students must obtain a minimum 3.5 grade point average on forty-eight credit hours in anthropology courses, including the required courses, and a minimum B grade on the Honours thesis (ANTH 4666). This programme is intended for those students interested in pursuing graduate studies.

Students intending to complete an Honours Programme in Anthropology must consult a faculty advisor and present an application to the Anthropology Department no later than the last day of February of the year preceding the anticipated graduation date.

Students wishing to pursue an Honours Programme are required to complete a minimum
of 48 credit hours in anthropology, including the following required courses:

1. All of:

ANTH 1013 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1023 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
ANTH 1033 Introduction to Archaeology
ANTH 2513 Cultural Anthropology
or ANTH 2523 Social Anthropology
ANTH 2806 Readings in Anthropological Theory
ANTH 3913 Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
ANTH 4003 Issues in Anthropology
ANTH 4013 Honours Seminar in Anthropology
ANTH 4666 Honours Thesis

Any course in area ethnography

2. At least one course at the 2000 level or above from either archaeology or physical anthropology

3. Two additional courses at the 3000 level or above.

Major in Anthropology

Students majoring in anthropology are required to complete a minimum of 39 credit hours in anthropology, including the following required courses:

1. All of:

ANTH 1013 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1023 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
ANTH 1033 Introduction to Archaeology
ANTH 2513 Cultural Anthropology
or ANTH2523 Social Anthropology
ANTH 2806 Readings in Anthropological Theory
ANTH 3913 Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
ANTH 4003 Issues in Anthropology

Any course in area ethnography

2. At least one course at the 2000 level or above from either archaeology or physical anthropology

3. Two additional courses at the 3000 level or above.

Minor in Anthropology

Students minoring in anthropology are required to complete a minimum of 18 credit hours in anthropology, including the following:

1. All of:

ANTH 1013 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1023 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
ANTH 1033 Introduction to Archaeology
ANTH 2543 Constructing Socio-Cultural Anthropology

   Any course in area ethnography

2. At least one additional course at the 3000 level or above.

Minor in Forensic Anthropology


Forensic anthropology intersects with both anthropological and forensic studies. It is a specialty within the subdiscipline of physical anthropology and, because it deals with the analysis of human skeletal remains in a medico-legal context, it has applications for forensic science.

Prospective students are advised that ANTH 1023 is not a prerequisite for any of the required courses; that the required courses are to be taken in the order listed, with each a prerequisite of the subsequent course; and that ANTH 4443 has an enrolment limit of 25 with admission requiring permission of the instructor.

Students minoring in forensic anthropology are required to complete a minimum of 18 credit hours, of which 9 credit hours are from the required courses and a minimum of 9 credit hours from the optional courses:

Required courses:
ANTH 2443 Human Skeletal Biology
ANTH 3443 Forensic Osteology and Archaeology
ANTH 4443 Applied Forensic Anthropology

Optional Courses:

ANTH 1023 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
ANTH 1033 Introduction to Archaeology
ANTH 2413 Human Physical Variation and Variability
BIOL 1551 Principles of Biology: Part I
BIOL 1552 Principles of Biology: Part II
CRIM 1006 Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice
HMRT 2003 Introduction to Human Rights
HMRT 3506 Human Rights in International and Foreign Policy

1013. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork. 3 credit hours.

1023. Introduction to Physical Anthropology
This is an introduction to the study of human evolution and human variation and to archaeology. It examines past societies through the systematic study of artifacts. 3 credit hours.

1033. Introduction to Archaeology
This course overviews cultural diversity throughout the archaeological record, emphasizing cultural
change. Topics such as adaptation, the development of complex societies, the rise of the state, and the role of archaeology in human history will be discussed. Basic archaeological methods, theory, and techniques will be presented. Multiple case studies, from different parts of the world, will llustrate how archaeologists recover, describe, and analyze the past. 3 credithours.

2303. Issues in Archaeology

The aim of this course is to critically explore current trends and issues in archaeological theory and methods, such as system theory, postprocessual theory, etc., and their impact on current practice in archaeology. 3 credit hours.

2313. Archaeology of Early Societies – The Americas (NATI)
This course examines the variety of cultural expressions in the Americas, based on archaeological
evidence. Early cultures will be examined first to set the stage for subsequent cultural evelopments. It will be an eclectic look at societies through time, including such topics as the rise of complex societies and development of plant and animal domesticates; various strategies for utilizing natural resources, particularly maritime adaptations, and regional studies of cultural development in North and South America. 3 credit hours.

2323. Archaeology of Early Societies – Eurasia, Africa, Oceania
The archaeological record of the origin and evolution of human culture and social behaviour. Emphasis is placed on earliest human culture and society, its development, and theoretical interpretations of this development. 3 credit hours.

2413. Human Physical Variation and Variability
This course will examine how and why human populations differ. The focus of the course will be biological; for example, variation in distribution of eye, hair, skin colour, and blood groups, thermal acclimatization, disease adaptations. Cultural factors often influence biological responses to the environment. This course will study the interaction of biology and culture in different environments. The format of the course will be a combination of in-class lab work/exercises and lectures. 3 credit hours.

2423. Human Evolution: Fact and Theory (CRIM)
This course is a study of the current knowledge and scientific debate regarding the origins and development of the human species. Fossil evidence and evolutionary theory from a historical and modern perspective are emphasized. This course includes a lab component. Not open to first-year students. 3 credit hours.

2443. Human Skeletal Biology
This course introduces the scientific discipline of forensic anthropology. The focus is on osteology,
the study of skeletal anatomy. Students will learn the details of both the human and nonhuman
skeleton in a concentrated lab format. Not open to first-year students. 3 credit hours.

2513. Cultural Anthropology

This course examines culture both conceptually and in its diverse forms ranging from foraging to peasant and industrial societies. Both non-Western and Western value systems and their social expression in political, economic, and ideological institutions will be studied from crosscultural and historical perspectives. The study of non-Western societies will also be used in a critical examination of contemporary Western industrial societies. 3 credit hours.

2523. Social Anthropology
This course investigates social forms such as kinship, marriage, descent, age groupings, and
interest associations, as well as processes of stratification, change, and social control in society.
Ethnographic examples are used to illustrate how social aspects of economy, political order,
religion, and language constitute social systems. 3 credit hours.

2533. Women in Cross-cultural Perspective (GEND)
This course examines male and female roles in a number of different cultural settings, especially
non-Western societies. Particular attention is given to the cultural expectations of gender behaviour, the structure of economic opportunities for males and females, and how shifts in opportunity structures impact gender roles. Various examples illustrating the roles of males and females in the context of marriage, domestic group organization, economic decision-making, and political decision-making will be presented. 3 credit hours.

2543. Constructing Socio-Cultural Anthropology
This course will introduce students to theories and methods of ethnography to enable them to arrive at an understanding of the building blocks and complexity of anthropology. Note: This course does not count for credit towards the Major or Honours Programme. 3 credit hours.

2553. Language, Culture, and Society

The course is concerned with the reflexive relationship of language, culture, and society. Emphasis is placed on language in use, and exemplary materials are selected mainly from "natural" speech and from ethnographic cases of language in use. Course content includes discussion of theories of meaning. 3 credit hours.

2563. Cultural Geography
This course examines various human cultures in the context of different geographical settings. The course is structured around five major themes: culture region, cultural diffusion, cultural ecology, cultural integration, and cultural landscape. These five themes help explain the role of humans in changing the face of the earth. The content of this course provides suitable material for social studies taught in the public schools. 3 credit hours.

2623. Applied Anthropology
This course distinguishes between applied and basic anthropological research and examines new career opportunities for anthropologists in such areas as public health, urban and community development, international development, human rights, education, and social services. Important ethical and policy considerations are reviewed within the context of the profession of applied anthropology. 3 credit hours.

2633. Issues in Ethnomusicology (FNAR)
The aim of this course is to examine a range of key issues in ethnomusicology, from the "classic" works of the discipline to contemporary theories and approaches, and including aesthetic systems, the representation of music, music and cultural change, and the musical articulation of social identity. The course will not only offer an insight into musical diversity in cultures around the world, but will also develop the fundamental view that music both expresses and actively constructs social and cultural realities. 3 credit hours.

2806. Readings in Anthropological Theory

This course is an intensive reading and seminar discussion on selected recent anthropological
theories. Students will read and analyze original works from the second half of the 20th century
to the present in an attempt to evaluate their explanatory value and their consequences in the development of anthropology as an academic discipline. 6 credit hours.

Area Ethnography 3003-3153
Ethnographic and ethnological study of the cultures of the following areas:
ANTH 3003 Caribbean ANTH 3073 Canada
ANTH 3013 South America ANTH 3083 Eastern North America
ANTH 3023 Circumpolar North ANTH 3103 South East Asia
ANTH 3043 Mexico and Central America ANTH 3123 Africa
ANTH 3053 The Mediterranean ANTH 3153 Australia
ANTH 3063 North America

3303. Anthropology of Law and Justice
Law and justice are important components of culture. This course will survey the anthropology of law and justice from its earliest to its most current forms. Western and non-Western forms of law, justice, and dispute resolution will be analyzed. Critical examinations of formal and informal law and justice will reveal how both are socially constructed and practiced in everyday life in different ways and for different purposes across cultures, nations, and institutions. 3 credit hours.

3313. The Anthropology of Art and Communication (FNAR)
This course looks at art as a form of communication. It will consider the role of ethnographic art in anthropology and the role of anthropology in producing ethnographic art. The course will look at the more sinister role of art as evocation, decoration, and captivation, and will study different art forms ranging from traps to body art. 3 credit hours.

3323. Hunter-Gatherers in the Modern World
This course begins by exploring the definitions of hunter-gatherers and by examining what sets them apart from other peoples. Early evolutionary views of hunter-gatherers are contrasted with current research on the diverse economic foundations of hunter-gatherer societies. The course covers questions of identity, property rights, gender, modes of production, and distribution of resources, drawing upon examples from various geographical areas. 3 credit hours.

3333. Economic Anthropology: Anthropology of Exchange
This course will explore how anthropologists have examined exchange, sharing, and transfers of goods within and between societies. Since Malinowski and Mauss, anthropologists have focused on gift giving and exchange. In this course we will contrast various forms of exchange paying special attention to the differences between gifts and commodities. We will explore what role money plays in subsistence economies and how some societies use levelling mechanisms to maintain egalitarian distribution. 3 credit hours.

3443. Forensic Osteology and Archaeology
The focus of this course is the application of osteology to the medical-legal investigation of deaths, including description and identification, determination of cause and manner of death, and estimation of time of death, and the collection of physical evidence. The course will be taught in a combined lecture/lab format. Prerequisite: ANTH 2443. 3 credit hours.

3533. Food
This course will examine the impact of technology on the pattern of food production, distribution, and consumption in industrialized and less-industrialized societies. Students will be introduced to issues of poverty, famine, food security, self-sufficiency, and humanitarian assistance as a means of nderstanding the technological, political, economic and cultural aspects of development and underdevelopment. 3 credit hours.

3643. Anthropology of Religion
This course emphasizes an understanding of religious phenomena by viewing religion in the context of the diversity of cultures. 3 credit hours.

3663. Urban Anthropology
This course emphasizes a cross-cultural approach to the characteristics of urban society. Major themes of the course include the processes and patterns of urbanization in developing and developed countries, and theories of rural-urban migration. The effects of urbanization on work, family, sense of community, housing, health, education, and recreation will also be examined. Anthropological research methods such as holism and participant observation will be examined and students will have an opportunity to be involved in urban ethnographic research projects. 3 credit hours.

3673. World Music (FNAR)
This course is an examination of musics from different parts of the world with the intent of understanding the significance of music in diverse cultural contexts. The course will take as fundamental the idea that music does not merely express underlying cultural realities, but plays an active role in constructing those cultural realities. More importantly, however, this course analyzes the cultural, political, and economic implications of the process whereby a wide range of the world's musics have been commodified and sold in the global music marketplace through the mediation of the global music industry. 3 credit hours.

3723. Human Ecology
Since its beginning, anthropology has been interested in the relationship between people and the geographical setting where cultures develop. The history of the discipline is full of contrasting examples in which nature and culture are used, within different conceptual and methodological frames, to explain cultural change, social structure, cultural development, and landscape history, among other topics. The main objective of this course is to explore such different approaches using examples from different biogeographical regions. 3 credit hours.

3803. Reading Ethnography
This is a course in reading ethnographic literature. It emphasizes reading comprehensively and profoundly in order to gain a fuller appreciation of different cultures, and it examines issues of translating cultures into the terms of our own Western understanding. Reading examples range from classic ethnographies to recent experimental designs in writing culture. 3 credit hours.

3913. Research Methods: Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
There are two main goals in this course. The primary one is to familiarize students with some of the basic research methods that anthropologists use to construct ethnographic case studies. In the course, the student will gain experience in gathering, recording, interpreting, and presenting qualitative research material. At the same time, we will consider the close relationship between data collection and ethnographic writing. In relation to the latter, students will carry out exercises designed to aid them in developing a clear and concise style of both more formal writing and less formal note taking. The overall goal of the class will be to learn to collect, analyze, and clearly present ethnographic data. 3 credit hours.


4003. Issues in Anthropology
A critical review of anthropological theory as it attempts to resolve issues such as those expressed by the oppositions between idealism— materialism, structure—process, nature— culture, etc. 3 credit hours.

4013. Honours Seminar in Anthropology
This course is designed to help you with your Honours thesis requirement. It involves both
practical work on your own thesis and a consideration of the written work of various anthropologists.
The course will include a consideration of the importance of both macro (large-scale)
and micro (small-scale) levels of analysis for contemporary ethnographic production. Special
attention will be given to the fit between theory and empirical evidence. Both classic and new
experimental styles of writing anthropology will receive consideration. 3 credit hours.

4443. Applied Forensic Anthropology

The focus of this course is the analysis of specific cases in forensic anthropology, demonstrating
how the various components of the law enforcement agencies become involved, and at what stage. The class will analyze the skeletal material associated with each case and do background research as a means of solving the case. This will involve learning about legislation in New Brunswick, courtroom use of anthropological materials, etc. The format of the course will be mainly in-class lab work accompanied by extensive research and off-campus visits. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ANTH 3443 and permission of the instructor. 3 credit hours.

4453. Seminar on Selected Topics
Directed research and seminar on a topic of current interest. 3 credit hours.

4553/6. Independent Study
A programme of independent study under the direction of a member of the faculty selected by the student. It is designed for students who wish to pursue an area of special interest through reading, research, and writing. 6 or 3 credit hours, depending on the project.

4666. Honours Thesis
The Honours thesis is a scholarly essay or research paper on a topic chosen by the student in
consultation with a faculty member who agrees to serve as thesis adviser. When completed, the thesis is read and graded by the thesis adviser and two other members of the Department. A minimum grade of B is required on the thesis for an Honours degree. 6 credit hours.

NOTE: Not all courses listed are offered each year.
Please consult with the Department Chair for more information about current and planned course offerings.


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