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Over the past few decades, the injurious effects of human behaviour on Earth's natural systems have become increasingly obvious. There can be little question that ecological changes leading to extinctions of species and loss of habitat pose a threat not only to our health, our prosperity and even our existence, but to the biosphere as a whole. Our failure to change our ways must be acknowledged and confronted. With its expertise in many domains of human endeavour, St. Thomas University is well prepared to help students interrogate the social processes that promote both our degradation of Earth and our persistence in such destructive behaviour.

The Major in Environment and Society will consist of 36 credit hours distributed as follows:

A. Required Environment and Society Courses
ENVS 2006 Introduction to Environment and Society
ENVS 3006 Environmental Policy and Praxis
ENVS 4003 Capstone Seminar in Environment and Society

B. Natural Science (Students are required to take 3 credit hours in an approved natural science course). Recommended courses are:
BIOL 2113 Ecology
PHYS 2543 Environmental Physics
Other courses may be substituted for either of these with the approval of the Programme Director.

C. Electives (18 credit hours from the following):
ANTH 3523 Social and Cultural Change
ANTH 3663 Urban Anthropology
ANTH 3723 Human Ecology
ECON 2203 Community Economic Development
ECON 3323 Environmental Economics
ENGL 2773 Reporting the Environment: The Journalism of John McPhee
HIST 2773 Urban North America
HIST 3403 Water in World History
HIST 3933 Canadian Land Struggles in Comparative Global Perspective since 1945
NATI 3223 Native Environmental Ethics and Ecology
PHIL 3563 Philosophy of Science
PSYC 2443 Environmental Psychology
PSYC 4443 Seminar in Environmental Psychology
RELG 2133 Religion and Ecology
RELG 3523 Environmental Ethics
STS 1003 Science, Technology, and the Environment I
STS 2103 Science, Technology, and the Environment II
SCWK 3823 Ecology and Social Justice
SOCI 2213 Society and Ecology
SOCI 4013 Sociological Theory and the Environment

Electives Available from UNB
HIST 2925 Technology and Western Society
PHIL 2106 Environmental Ethics
PHIL 3106-9 Selected Topics in Philosophy of the Environment
POLS 1603 Politics of Globalization
POLS 3453 Politics and Technology

D. Double Major
Students completing the Major in Environment and Society are required to complete a
second Major as well. This second Major may be in any field of their choice. ENVS electives
taken from other departments may be counted both for the ENVS Major and for the
Major in that Department.

2006. Introduction to Environment and Society
This is a required course for the Major in Environment and Society which is designed to integrate the entire programme of study. The seminar will focus on developing a multidisciplinary understanding of a selection of environmental issues as determined by student and faculty interests. Issues considered will include ecological damage, social origins, and alternative approaches to addressing problems. Prerequisite: ENVS 3006 or permission of the instructor. 6 credit hours.

3006. Environmental Policy and Praxis
Building upon familiarity with the major perspectives within the environmental movement, this course will review various approaches to resolving environmental problems such as: bioregionalism, sustainable growth, deep ecology, rightsizing economic activity, etc. A component of this course may be service learning. Prerequisite: ENVS 2006 or permission of the instructor. 6 credit hours.

4003. Capstone Seminar in Environment and Society
This is a required course for the Major in Environment & Society which is designed to integrate the entire programme of study. The seminar will focus on developing a multidisciplinary understanding of a selection of environmental issues as determined by student and faculty interests.
Issues considered will include ecological damage, social origins, and alternative approaches to addressing problems. Prerequisite: ENVS 3006 or permission of the instructor. 3 credit hours.