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NOTE: Not all courses listed are offered each year. Please consult with the department chair for more information about current and planned course offerings.

2013. Introduction to Social Welfare
This is a mandatory course for all second-year B.S.W. students. An examination of the history, philosophy, and development of social welfare as a social institution in New Brunswick and elsewhere. Analysis of the institution and its relationship to the history, philosophy, and values
of the profession of social work. 3 credit hours. Note: This course is required for all other Social Work courses with the exception of SCWK 2023 Introduction to Social Work.

2023. Introduction to Social Work
This is a mandatory course for all second-year B.S.W. students. An introduction to the values, ethics, history, and methods of professional social work practice, with particular emphasis on the profession in New Brunswick. An introduction to generic practice and social work with various client groups. 3 credit hours. Note: This course is required for all other Social Work courses with the exception of SCWK 2013 Introduction to Social Welfare.

2036. Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare
In this course, students will be introduced to the breadth of social welfare services in Canada, the essential features of social work, and the theoretical foundations which inform them. Developments within social welfare and social work in Canada will be reviewed by situating
them in the context of the values, beliefs, and societal priorities dominant at the time. Students will not receive credit for both SCWK 2036 and SCWK 2013/2023.

3016. Theory for Social Work Practice I
This is a mandatory course for all third-year BSW students. A central assumption of this course is that social work as a profession needs to be self-critical in order to guard against continuing and increasing oppression experienced by members of various groups as they access social welfare programmes and social work intervention. Therefore a critical analysis of social welfare, social services and social work practice (primarily in the Canadian context) will be a central focus in the course.

The perspectives of neo-conservatism, liberalism, social democracy and Marxism will be presented and analyzed for how each defines social issues, social welfare responses and social work approaches. Alternative paradigms will also be offered for students to consider. An emphasis is placed on structural social work theory and practice as a framework for social work practice within and outside governmental agencies, however, some additional anti-oppressive practices are introduced. This course is to be taken prior to, or concurrently with Field Instruction 1. Available to BSW students only. 6 credit hours.

3013. Field Instruction I (a)
This course focuses on the development of a “learning contract” for beginning professional development. Students will be involved in seminars, field visits, and workshops as an introduction to practice in the field. Life and work experience will be applied to the development of the contract, focussing on awareness of beginning values, biases, attitudes, and ideas in entering the field. Two days per week. 3 credit hours. Available to third-year B.S.W. students only.

3023. Field Instruction I (b)
This course provides the initial practical experience in the field in an approved field placement setting under faculty supervision. The focus throughout the field programme will be on integration of classroom and field learning. Prerequisite: Field Instruction I (a). Two days per week. 3
credit hours.

Students who have worked a minimum of two years in the field of social work may apply for a competency credit for SW 3023. For more nformation on this competency credit contact a faculty person in the Department of social work.

Field Instruction Supervisors

Archer, Denis, BA, BEd (STU), MEd (UNB)
Oromocto High School Guidance Center, Oromocto, NB

Barrie, Paul
Department of Public Safety, Fredericton, NB

Barton, Sandra, BSW (STU)
Family and Community Services, Fredericton, NB

Bertin, Johanna, BA, MSW (U of T)
Dr. Everett Chalmers Hospital, Fredericton, NB

Bérubé-Gervais, Bernise, BSW ( U de Moncton)
Post Adoption Services, Fredericton, NB

Bonner, Eileen, BA (STU), MSW (Wilfrid Laurier)
Family and Community Services, Fredericton, NB

Bourgette, Erin, BBA (Mt. St. Vincent)
Partners for Youth Inc., Fredericton, NB

Brennan, Irene, RN (Plushing Hospital School of Nursing), BSN (Queens College) Youth in Transition, Fredericton, NB

Brewer, Tina
Fredericton Residential Youth Services, Fredericton, NB

Burke, Rose, BA (UNB), BSW (STU)
Correctional Services of Canada, Fredericton, NB

Cabel, Elizabeth
Albert Street Middle School, Fredericton, NB

Carlson, Pat, BA (STU), N & CM Certificate (Dal), Certificate IV (Teachers College) Fredericton Emergency Shelter, Inc.

Charnley, Alison J., BA, BSW (STU), LLB (UNB)
Family and Community Services, Fredericton, NB

Christie, Joe, BA, BEd, BSW (STU), MEd (UNB)
Addiction Services, Fredericton, NB

Cloney-Bowlen, Gaynell, BSW (STU), MEd (UNB)
Victim-Witness Unit, Fredericton Police Force, Fredericton, NB

Coates, Judy, BSW (Laurentian)
CISV Children's International Summer Village, Fredericton, NB

Coy, Stacy, BA (STU), BSW (Carleton)
Canadian Red Cross, Fredericton, NB

Cudmore, Shelley, BA (UPEI), BSW (Dal)
Home Care and Support Services, Queen Region, Charlottetown, PE

DesRoches, Dina, BA (Mt. A), MSW (U of T)
Victim Services - Office of the Attorney General, Charlottetown, PE

Dingwell, Julie, BA (UNBSJ)
AIDS Saint John, Inc., Saint John, NB

Doak, George, BSc, BEd, MEd (UNB)
Fredericton High School, Fredericton, NB

Dominic, Veronica, BA (St. FX), BSW (MUN)
Family and Community Services, Fredericton, NB

Eatmon, John, MSW (DAL)
Family and Community Services, Moncton, NB

Feeney-Barrett, Nancy, BA (STU)
Department of Public Safety - Victim Services, Fredericton, NB

Fitzgerald, Sharon
Mill Cove Nursing Home, Mill Cove, NB

Flaro, Haley
AIDS New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB

Gauthier, Eileen, BSW (STU), MSW (U of T)
Department of Family and Community Services, Saint John, NB

George, Maria, BA (Western Michigan U) BSW (STU)
Mental Health Center, Fredericton, NB

Goodine, Candace
Family and Community Services, Fredericton, NB

Halassy Judy, BA (UNBSJ)
St. Joseph's Community Health Centre, Saint John, NB

Hartt, Jolene
Family and Community Services, Fredericton, NB

Hicks, Donna, MEd (UNB), CCC (Canadian Counselling Assoc)
Fredericton Police Force - Victim Witness Unit, Fredericton, NB

Hitchcock, Carla, BA (STU), BHSD (U of Victoria)
Fredericton Regional Family Resource Centre, Fredericton, NB

Hovey, O. Marilyn, BSW (STU)
Department of Health and Welfare, Mental Health, Fredericton, NB

Hoyt, Anne C., Dip in Nursing (Saint John General Hospital), Certificate in Gero (STU), GNCCO (Canadian Nurses Association), Certificate in Adult Education (St. FX), York Manor Nursing Home, Fredericton, NB

Kalaba, Ljiljana, Settlement Worker
Multicultural Association of Fredericton, Fredericton, NB

Kelly, Carol, BSW (STU)
Family and Community Services, Fredericton, NB

Loukes, Judy
Liberty Lane, Fredericton, NB

Lutz, John, BA (Sir George Williams U), MSW (McGill)
Shepody Healing Centre, Correctional Services Canada, Dorchester, NB

MacAulay, Ed
Child and Family Services - Kings Health Region, Montague, PE

MacNevin, Myrt, MSW (Wilfrid Laurier)
Home Care and Support Services, Queen Region, Charlottetown, PE

MacPherson, Bruce, BSW (STU), MSW (Carleton)
Addictions Unit of River Valley Health, Fredericton, NB

Mann, Tom, B of Comm (Dal), LLB (UNB)
New Brunswick Public Employees Association, Fredericton, NB

Manuel, Lindsay, LLB (UNB), BSc (St. Mary's)
CHIMO Helpline, Inc., Fredericton, NB

Matheson, Lynne
Fundy Region Transition House, Inc., St. Stephen, NB

Maynard, Susan
Victim Services - Office of the Attorney General, Charlottetown, PE

McBrine, Jean
Canadian Mental Health Association of Fredericton/Oromocto Region, NB

McCourt, Wendy, BSW (STU), MSW (MUN)
West Prince Health -Child and Family Services, O'Leary, PE

McGinn, Jane, BSc English, M English (UNB)
Student Affairs, St. Thomas University, Fredericton, NB

McIntyre, Jennifer, BA (Mt. St. V), BSW (McGill)
Department of Community Services, Dartmouth, NS

Melanson, Rosella, Bacc ès service social (U de Moncton), MA (U of WO), DEA Communications, (Université de Grenoble III France)
NB Advisory Council on the Status of Women, Fredericton, NB

Mildenberger, Stefan
Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, NB

Morrison, Evelyn, BA, BSW (STU)
Mental Health Centre, Fredericton, NB

Mullen, Sherrill, BA (UNB), BSW (STU)
Family and Community Services, Fredericton, NB

Osmond, Marci, BA (STU)
Family and Community Services, Fredericton, NB

Pierce, Darren M, BA (UNB)
Fredericton Residential Youth Services, Inc., Fredericton, NB

Piers, Hope, BA, BSW (STU)
Community Health Clinic, Fredericton, NB

Rivett, Linda
Connaught Street School, Fredericton, NB

Robertson, Jennifer, MSW (Wilfrid Laurier)
Child and Family Services - Kings Health Region, Montague, PE

Rogers, Rhonda, BSW (STU)
Big Brothers/Big Sisters Association of Fredericton and Oromocto Inc., NB

Root, Alanda
Women in Transition House, Inc., Fredericton, NB

Sacobie, Gloria, BSW (STU)
St. Mary's Child and Family Services, Fredericton, NB

Sacobie, Gary, BSW (STU)
Kingsclear Child and Family Services, Kingsclear, NB

Saulnier-Roussel, Claire, Bacc ès service social (U de Moncton)
Family and Community Services, Bathurst, NB

Seale, Holly
Family and Community Services, Saint John, NB

Seymour, Peter, BEd (UNB)
NBCC, Woodstock, NB

Smith, E. Anne
Family Enrichment and Counselling Services, Fredericton, NB

Somerville, Peter
York Manor Nursing Home, Fredericton, NB

Stack, Heather
Family and Community Services, Fredericton NB

Stickles, Adam, BA (STU)
Fredericton Probation Office, Fredericton, NB

Stone-Wills, Holly, BA (Carleton), BSW (Dal), MEd (UNB), RSW (NBASW) Department of Family and Community Services, Saint John, NB

Stranach, Bob, BA, BSW (STU)
National Crime Prevention Centre, Fredericton, NB

Tecu, Jeremias, BA (Universidad de san Carlos de Guatemala)
Multicultural Association of Fredericton, NB

Teed, Joan, BSW (STU), MEd Counselling (UNB), BSc (Dal)
Region 3 Hospital Corporation, Fredericton, NB

Thibodeau, Carmelle
Friends and Fellowship, Inc., Fredericton, NB

Toner, Bill, BA (Carleton) BSW (STU)
Queens North Community Health Centre, Minto, NB

Toumishey, Gavin, BSW (MUN)
Family and Community Services, Child Protection, St. Stephen, NB

Vail, Lianne
RCMP - Victim Services, Oromocto, NB

Walker, Sylvia
Family and Community Services, Sussex, NB

Weeks, Murray, BA, BSW (STU)
River Valley Health, Chalmers Regional Hospital, Fredericton, NB

Welock, Nancy
Family and Community Services, Fredericton, NB

Whalley, Lorraine, BA, BSW (STU)
Fredericton Sexual Assault Crisis Centre, Inc., Fredericton, NB

Wright, Gail, BSW (STU)
Family and Community Services, Moncton, NB

3026. Theory for Social Work Practice I
This is a mandatory course for all post-degree BSW students. A central assumption of this course is that social work as a profession needs to be self-critical in order to guard against continuing and increasing oppression experienced by members of various groups as they access social welfare programmes and social work intervention. Therefore a critical analysis of social welfare, social services and social work practice (primarily in the Canadian context) will be a central focus in the course.

The perspectives of neo-conservatism, liberalism, social democracy and Marxism will be presented and analyzed for how each defines social issues, social welfare responses and social work approaches. Alternative paradigms will also be offered for students to consider. An emphasis is placed on structural social work theory and practice as a framework for social work practice within and outside governmental agencies, however, some additional anti-oppressive practices are introduced. Available to BSW students only. 6 credit hours.

3033. Applied Social Research
This course will review the place of research in social work and will focus on the social worker both as a producer and as a consumer of research knowledge. An overview of the research process and the major categories of research will be presented, as well as criteria for evaluating research reports. Upon completion of this course, it is expected that students will have acquired the ability to participate in the carrying out of a research project, and that they will be able to locate, assess, and use research reports intelligently. 3 credit hours.

3043. Skills for Social Work Practice
The purpose of this course is twofold: to begin preparing students for their initial field placement experience and to explore the theory and skills relevant to crisis intervention. This includes an orientation to the values and characteristics of social work practice, a clarification of expectations of students in field placement, a focus on increasing self-awareness as important knowledge for practice, an emphasis on developing skills for experiential learning, and the development of beginning competency in generic crisis intervention theory, and skills common to all levels of social work practice. 3 credit hours.

3113. Crisis Intervention
This course provides an introduction to the theory and approaches to crisis intervention. Such topics as developmental, situational and institutional crises; crisis intervention techniques; assessment of intervention with suicidal clients; and awareness of crisis intervention in unique crises situations, (e.g. hot line work, disasters and post-traumatic stress disorders), will be explored. 3 credit hours.

3123. Direct Social Work Practice
This is a mandatory course for all BSW students. An introduction to the theory and skills of helping individuals. The course will focus on understanding the stages of the helping process and on the acquisition of specific skills in communicating, assessing problems, planning, contracting, implementing change, and terminating the process. The skills of writing social work records will also be emphasized. 3 credit hours.

3133. The Family in its Social Context
An introduction to different theoretical approaches to understanding family functioning. As part of this understanding, students will be asked to look at their family of origin. Theories of family systems, life cycle, and transgenerational patterns will be examined. The effects of the social
context on families, from a feminist-informed perspective, will be presented and examined. 3 credit hours.

3143. Social Work Practice with Families
This course will explore major social work approaches to intervention with families. Students will be expected to develop basic skills in family interviewing, assessment and change. 3 credit hours.

3153. Group Work
This is a laboratory course in which students will develop skills in group membership, leadership, and programme design. Practical group experiences are utilized to demonstrate theories of group development, and to enhance group assessment and intervention skills. 3 credit hours.

3213. Women and Social Work
This course is designed to enable students to examine critically first the oppression of women in our society, in particular as consumers of social services; second the developing literature, theory, and practice of “feminist counselling” as a significant new approach to working with women; and third, the position and status of women within the social work profession. 3 credit hours.

3223. Social Work and the Organization
This course is designed to assist social workers to practise within human service organizations and to participate in the process of organizational development and change. 3 credit hours.

3233. Social Work in Rural Areas
Much of the social work knowledge and practice was developed in large urban areas and has limited relevance to non-urban areas such as rural New Brunswick. This course will examine the unique nature of rural areas and the implication that this unique nature holds for the social
work practitioner. The emphasis of the course will be on the generic nature of rural interventions and the need to maintain an orderly and well-defined problem-solving approach which is sensitive to individual and community issues. 3 credit hours.

3243. Community Organization
This course introduces students to the theory and practice of community organization. It provides a beginning knowledge base and skills for facilitating social change in the context of community. Content areas include the nature of community, the process of community organizing, strategies such as social action, diversity and social change, and the role of the community worker. 3 credit hours.

3313. Global Issues in Social Work and Social Welfare
This course will provide an opportunity for students to develop a beginning awareness, sensitivity, and understanding of the scope and impact of global or international issues on the lives of people in other parts of the world and our own lives, as well as on social policies and social work practice at all levels. As well, this course will explore the efforts of organizations (at the local, national, and international levels) which address international concerns. 3 credit hours.

3323. Social Policy and Social Planning
This is a mandatory course for all BSW students. Concepts in policy planning are studied, along with an examination of the process of planned change from problem identification to programming. Consideration will be given to the political arena, the bureaucracy and roles of the politician, and the public servant. Three hours per week. 3 credit hours.

3333. Social Development
This course examines the concepts and issues surrounding social development as an alternative approach to the dominant service orientation to social welfare. Students will have an opportunity to examine new ways of conceptualizing social work purposes and practice in advanced capitalist societies by studying concrete examples representing attempts by marginalized groups and communities to solve needs fundamental to their well being. 3 credit hours.

3513. Social Work, Organizations, and Native People
This course will assist social workers to practice in human service organizations in Native communities. The course will include a theoretical and historical analysis of why and how specific organizations such as the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND)
impact First Nations communities. There will be an emphasis on issues of leadership and political organizations which are of particular interest to First Nations. Issues involved in the attainment of self government and implications for social work practice will also be discussed. 3 credit hours.

3713. Fields of Practice
This course involves an in-depth examination of a particular field of practice, (e.g., mental health, corrections, child welfare) based on student and instructor interest. The focus of the course will be examination and analysis of unmet needs in the field, and professional response to them. 3 credit hours.

3713. Trauma and Social Work Practice
This course provides an introduction to social work practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities coping with the impact of trauma in their lives. The goals of this course include the development and demonstration of a critical understanding of trauma theory in its historical, political, and social contexts; knowledge of practice approaches to trauma work; application of this knowledge through assessment and beginning intervention skills; and selfawareness in relation to traumatic material. Ethical issues and exploration of personal and professional values will be incorporated into class material. 3 credit hours.

3723. Child Welfare
This course is designed to introduce students to the child welfare system in New Brunswick and Canada, and to examine the policies, procedures, and practices which have been developed to respond to the needs of children and adolescents. As such, another purpose of the course is to critique existing policies, procedures, and practices and to discuss ways in which the child welfare delivery system could be more responsive to the needs of children and their families. Alternative responses and innovative programmes will be examined and students will be challenged to be creative in developing ideas which would lead to evolving the child welfare
system in the direction of better meeting children’s needs. 3 credit hours.

3733. Social Work and Aging (GERO)
An examination of present services to the elderly population in New Brunswick and elsewhere, and identification of unmet needs. Analysis of knowledge and practice principles developed in the field of gerontological practice. 3 credit hours.

3743. Social Work with Oppressed Groups
This course will introduce social work students to the concept and nature of modern day oppression: its origin, its causes, its various forms, its dynamics, the social processes and practices that produce amd reproduce it, the political functions it carries out for the dominant
group, its effects on oppressed groups, and the various responses of oppressed persons to it including internalized oppression. The situation and experiences of several oppressed groups in Canadian society will be examined, and anti-oppressive forms of social work practice at all
levels of intervention will be explored. 3 credit hours.

3753. Anti-racist Social Work
This course is designed to enable students to gain greater knowledge about the sources, manifestation, and consequences of racism in contemporary Canada and to develop the commitment and skills to practice social work in a culturally competent and anti-racist manner.
Students will consider the ways in which racism permeates traditional social work ideology and practice. A strucural approach to social work in a multicultural context which links racism to other forms of oppression will be explored. 3 credit hours.

3763. Spirituality and Social Work
The overall goal of this course is to explore the role of spirituality in social work, and to identify how the spiritual dimension can be incorporated into social work practice. Students will be exposed to a discussion of the religious/spiritual dimensions of human behaviour and the impact religions and/or spiritual issues have on individual growth, community functioning, policy development, and social change. Students will also have an opportunity to reconcile their spiritual beliefs with professional expectations and to develop a beginning level of comfort and competence at integrating the “spiritual” in practice. 3 credit hours.

3773. Elements of Statistics
An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics used in social work research. Topics will include the organization and presentation of statistical data, measures of central tendency and variation, elementary probability, confidence intervals, sampling, hypothesis testing, correlation,
linear regression, and analysis of variance. 3 credit hours. NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who already have received credit for an introductory statistics course in another discipline at STU or from another university.

3783. Law and Social Work
An examination of the relationship between the institutions of law and social welfare. The role of social work in the administration of justice. Basic legal concepts useful to social workers. 3 credit hours.

3793. AIDS and Social Work
This course provides students with an overview of the psychosocial, medical, and political aspects of HIV/AIDS. Students will have an opportunity to integrate their understanding of HIV/AIDS with levels of social work intervention. 3 credit hours.

3813. Native Child Welfare
This course will provide theoretical frameworks and practice skills relevant to the field of child welfare in Native communities in Canada. As well, the course will review historical development and cultural factors which influence Native child welfare policies, services, and programmes.
3 credit hours.

3823. Ecology and Social Justice
This course will examine the relationship between ecological devastation and social injustice. The course will review the forces, both national and global as well as governmental and nongovernmental, which contribute to the exploitation of the environment and people. Values, policies, and interventions which are conducive to bringing about social and ecological justice will be examined. Potential roles for social work, particularly at the individual, community, and societal levels, will be discussed. 3 credit hours.

3833. Social Work and Family Diversity
This course is intended to develop a knowledge base of the structural differences and dynamic issues faced by diverse family structures such as step families, single- parent families, gay and lesbian families, foster families, and adoptive families. 3 credit hours.

3843. Social Work with the Bereaved
This course is designed to familiarize students with the impact loss has on one's everyday life, to examine theoretically the concepts of grief and bereavement, and to be able to integrate those theories into social work practice. Loss on multiple levels will be explored; including loss
experienced through ill health, breakup of relationships, life-changing events, and death. Grief counselling theories and skills will be an interlinked component of the course. 3 credit hours.

3853. Mental Health Issues and Professional Practice
This course examines mental health issues encountered by the professional with an emphasis on practice and policy implications. Students will have an opportunity to explore the context of practice from an historical perspective and to critically examine the current mental health delivery system in New Brunswick. The role of the professional and professional interventions will be examined. 3 credit hours.

3863. Social Work and Addictions
In this course, students will develop an understanding of the components of substance abuse as well as the addictive process. Topics will include the various mood-altering drugs, the components of early identification, assessment and treatment, harm reduction, and health promotion
programmes. 3 credit hours.

3873. Social Work and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Two-Spirited Peoples
This course examines some of the concepts and definitions concerning sexuality, gender expression, and sexual orientation in the context of a dominant heterosexual world. It examines issues of concern to gay, lesbian, bisexual, and two-spirited peoples and the place of social work in working with this population. 3 credit hours.

3883. Foundations in Native Issues
This course is an introduction to Native issues and constitutes a foundation for social work practice with Native peoples. Indigenous world views globally will be explored with emphasis on Native peoples in Maritime Canada. The impact of colonial practices and policies on
Indigenous peoples will be examined in the context of issues relevant to social work practice with Native and Indigenous peoples. 3 credit hours.

3893. Conflict Management and Dispute Resolution
This course will introduce students to the process of evaluation of conflict situations; the range of methods by which disputes may be resolved, including the processes of negotiation, conciliation and mediation; and the skills necessary to facilitate a resolution. 3 credit hours.

4012. Field Instruction III
This course is a continuation of Field Instruction 1(b), and also provides practical experience in the field, in an approved setting, under faculty supervision. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skills in the field sufficient for initial professional practice with various client constituencies. 700 hours. 12 credit hours.

4016. Theory for Social Work Practice II
This is a mandatory course for all fourth-year BSW students. The course provides a base for professional practice by introducing the values and ethics of the profession, and theories relevant to social work practice with individuals, groups, and communities. Knowledge drawn from the social sciences and other disciplines will be integrated with methods of intervention. Prerequisites: SCWK 3016, SCWK 3013, SCWK 3023. 6 credit hours.

4019. Field Instruction II
This course is a continuation of Field Instruction I (b), and also provides practical experience in the field, in an approved setting, under faculty supervision. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skills in the field sufficient for initial professional practice with various client constituencies. Two days per week. Prerequisite: Field Instruction 1. Available to B.S.W. students only. 9 credit hours.

4023. Social Work Field Integration Seminar
Mandatory for post-degree BSW students, this seminar enables students to relate practice issues to social theory, and to develop a personal credo for social work. Students will explore solutions to actual issues encountered during their practicum placements by drawing upon
their social work knowledge and value and skill bases. 3 credit hours.

4313. Current Issues in Canadian Social Policy
This course is designed to provide an overview and analysis of specific social policy issues in Canada. The course will explore some of the substantive areas of Canadian social policy such as income security, unemployment and housing policy, address the effects of social policy on various demographic groups in society, and focus on the general restructuring of the welfare state and its implications for social work and social policy. Prerequisite: SCWK 3323. 3 credit hours.

4713. Feminist Counselling
This course will provide an in-depth critique of traditional approaches to helping women, explore the theory, ethics, and practice of feminist counselling, and provide students with the opportunity to learn the skills and techniques of feminist counsellintg. Prerequisites: SCWK 3213 and SCWK 3123. 3 credit hours.

NOTE: Not all courses listed are offered each year. Please consult with the Department Chair for more information about current and planned course offerings.

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